Accidentally Clicked on a Phishing Link – Now What

Accidentally Clicked on a Phishing Link – Now What

You know that searing flush-faced feeling when you pretty much know you made a mistake with a slip of the finger? Sometimes it’s sending a text too soon or responding to an email without editing your response. Other times it’s when you click on something you likely shouldn’t have … and then the “uh oh” escapes … and then the big sigh.

 

When we multitask, whether it is at work or at home, we do tend to slip up at times and open something that we shouldn’t. Then enters adware, malware, ransonmare, spyware, and whatever-else-is-next-ware into our lives.

 

Oops! Now what?

 

There are some imperative steps to take to alleviate harm to you and/or the network you may be connected with:

– Try not to panic. This happens to everyone. Antivirus and anti-malware will come into play and you will need to have a full system scan. But first …

– End the session immediately by turning off Wi-Fi, unplugging from an ethernet cable or completely shutting down all of your devices.

– Initiate a back up of your files. Since you won’t be connected to the internet at this point, you won’t be able to accomplish this to the cloud. Having an external drive, DVD or thumb drive are always nice to have on hand during times like these.

– Change your login/password to email account(s) and enable two-factor authentication if this hasn’t already occurred.

– If you are employed by a company or organization, reference your manual and let your network administrator know of the potential issue.

– After all is said and done, check your antivirus/anti-malware software and run a full scan.

 

Being informed of what steps you may need to take before a slip up happens can help ease the potential damage (and your stress level) if it does. As always, if you need help or have any concerns, we are available 24/7/365 for you.

Flying This Summer? How to Prevent Juice Jacking

Flying This Summer? How to Prevent Juice Jacking

Vacations are indeed wonderful. Traveling to a new destination or to a familiar favorite locale is a treasured experience with memories that can last a lifetime. On the other hand, traveling on business might not be as fun, but it is a must for many. Going from point A to point B can be stressful at times. Weather, flight delays, overbooked flights, long layovers or not having enough time between flights causing you to miss your next connection … you name it, it can happen. Next thing you know, your device battery is getting low. So, what do you do? Is it safe to recharge at a public charging station? Not always.

 

Juice jacking is a type of cyber attack and typically involves public USBs. Public charging stations, such as those found in airports, train stations, hotel lobbies, and even your rental car, can make your personal data very vulnerable and open your device up to malware.

 

As reported in Forbes, a growing number of nation-state hackers have been training their sights on travelers. New research from IBM, in the 2019 IBM X-Force Threat Intelligence Index, reveals that the transportation industry has become a priority target for cybercriminals as the second-most attacked industry — up from tenth in 2017. Since January 2018, 566 million records from the travel and transportation industry have been leaked or compromised in publicly reported breaches.”

 

What steps can you take to prevent juice jacking from happening to you?

– Don’t leave home without a fully charged battery.

– Carry a charging cord with you so you can use a wall socket instead of a public USB.

– Purchase an external battery pack.

– Turn off your phone to save your battery when feasible.

– Learn how to optimize your device’s battery settings.