Scams, Scams and More Darn Scams

Scams, Scams and More Darn Scams

Did you know that there are at least 48 different types of identity theft and the number of scams involved in each is growing daily? Romance scams, residence scams, utility scams, employment scams, telephone scams, email scams, charity scams, Apple care scams, AirBNB scams, PayPal scams, census scams, ticket scams, government scams, medical scams, insurance scams, real estate scams, investment scams, lottery and sweepstakes scams … there really isn’t one facet of our lives that isn’t ‘scam-able.’ As the weather turns colder, it kind of makes you want to curl up under an electric blanket and hibernate for a bit doesn’t it!

 

Although everyone with a social security number is at risk for identity theft, there are two groups that are targeted more often: children and seniors. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has studied why. They explain, “Children are targeted to establish a ‘clean slate.’ Seniors are targeted over the telephone and through phishing scams. Some studies suggest that people become more trusting as they age, which helps to explain why it’s more difficult for older adults to detect fraudsters.”

 

The next high-risk group that follows children and seniors are the military mostly due to deployment, which impacts their ability to respond to a threat in a timely manner. According to the Federal Trade Commission, military consumers are most affected by credit card and bank fraud. Another high-risk group is identity theft repeat victims. As reported in Consumer Affairs, “people who have previously been affected by identity theft are at a greater risk for future identity theft and fraud.” According to the Center for Victim Research, “7-10% of the U.S. population are victims of identity fraud each year and 21% of those experience multiple incidents of identity theft.”

 

Lastly, the deceased are targeted. Stealing a dead person’s identity, commonly known as “ghosting,” will often go unnoticed by surviving family for months or years. A report dating from 2012 stated that 2.5 million deceased American identities are stolen each year. Of those 2.5 million stolen identities, 800,000 were used to open lines of credit or get a mobile phone plan.

 

Fraudsters oftentimes repeat their favorite most lucrative scams, which are driven by major financial life moments, such as taxes and holiday shopping. Yes, it’s getting to be that time of year, and, guess what … the world’s largest online retailer, Amazon, is seeing a huge increase in fake Amazon.com order cancellation scams. If you receive an email about an order cancellation from Amazon, there’s a good chance it’s a scam. Click on links in the email and you could unintentionally download malware onto your device. Or you might be sent to a site that aims to collect your Amazon account information, like your username and password. If you receive such an email and recently placed an order, go to Amazon.com directly to check your order status.

 

Most of our blogs offer tips to help protect yourself and your family from identity theft. There is one tip in this blog: Remain aware of scams and that they can touch every facet of your life. By staying in-the-know, you can help every month be National Cybersecurity Awareness month … not just October.

 

If you suspect that you or a loved one has suffered identity theft, please reach out to us as soon as possible. Our Guard Well member services team is available around the clock, every day of the year. Email memberservices@guardwellid.com or call 888.966.GUARD (4827) for help.

DoorDash Data Breach: How to Tell if You’ve Been Hacked

DoorDash Data Breach: How to Tell if You’ve Been Hacked

Remember when home-cooked meals happened six nights a week instead of just during the holidays? I don’t really do either. Delivery is indeed a major convenience though. From groceries and prescriptions to corporate lunches, family dinners and late night snacks, if you can order it on an app, such as Uber Eats, it can be on your doorstep in about an hour. Yes, delivery is a major convenience but, just like with everything in life, there are risks and your data can be compromised. Just ask the almost $5 million DoorDash users, merchants and workers who were recently hacked. Hits a little too close to home.

 

Consumer behavior, along with the concept of dinnertime itself, have both evolved in the past few years, making food delivery one of the the newest up and coming fads. The industry, referred to as third party logistics, is experiencing “unprecedented growth to the tune of $43 billion in deliveries (2018) and is forecasted to rise to $76 billion by 2022.” As reported in Barron’s, GrubHub this past spring was losing the food-delivery war with DoorDash stealing the show. “For the industry, DoorDash’s pace of share gain is the dominant trend,” reported KeyBanc analyst Andy Hargreaves, March, 2019. DoorDash just recently surpassed Uber Eats as the second-largest food-delivery service in the U.S. after GrubHub. We regularly use all three providers, but with a preference for DoorDash only because of the availability of restaurant choices.

 

What actually was hacked?

The latest report according to Business Insider, detailed that the breach occurred in May and affects some users who started using the DoorDash app before April 5, 2018…. “DoorDash said an unauthorized third party was able to access some users’ profile information, including names, email addresses, delivery addresses, order history and phone numbers.” The article continued to report that the last four digits of some consumers’ credit cards were also accessed, but not full card numbers or CVVs. “For some delivery workers and restaurants, the unauthorized third party accessed the last four digits of bank-account numbers.” DoorDash did announce that the “credit card and banking information is not sufficient to make fraudulent charges or withdrawals.” That gives us a little peace of mind. Maybe.

 

How do you know if you were hacked?

DoorDash reported to Business Insider that it had begun contacting people affected by the data breach and will continue to do so as they become known. The company did recommend that even those who hadn’t been contacted by DoorDash regarding the breach should still change their password immediately to be safe.

 

– If you signed up for DoorDash after April 5, 2018, your data is likely safe. If you can’t recall when you signed up, contact them to find out.

– Check your bank account(s) which are tied to your DoorDash account for fraudulent activity. Hackers count on people not reviewing every item on their credit card and bank statements.

– Contact your identity theft solutions provider immediately and especially if you notice anything “off” in your statement(s).

– Do you use the same password for multiple accounts? We recommend that your passwords are updated on a routine basis and that the same one isn’t used across multiple accounts.

 

Hackers will continue to hack. That is a definite certainty in this day and age. When we set up any type of home delivery, it is unnerving to not be able to trust that they will keep us safe as well as our food. Maybe we all should go back to those home-cooked meals … now, how do you turn the oven on again?

 

Need help? Our Member Services team is here for you 24/7/365. Call us at 888.966.GUARD (4827) or email memberservices@guardwellid.com.

 

References:

Fortune. Morris, Chris. “DoorDash Data Breach: What to Do If Your Account Was Compromised.” September 27, 2019.

Business Insider. Holmes, Aaron. “DoorDash Hack: How to Tell If You’re Affected.” September 26, 2019.

Ten Signs You Have Been a Victim of Identity Theft

Ten Signs You Have Been a Victim of Identity Theft

Identity theft is rampant. One in three data breach victims will experience fraud according to a 2018 study by Javelin Strategy & Research. The number of identity fraud victims in the United States alone is at 16.7 million with over $16.8 billion stolen. Read More

 

Do you know the latest signs of identity theft? Here are the top ten red flags that trouble is brewing:

– You receive a notice, either in the mail or via email, that you have been a part of a data breach.

– Your credit score quickly drops without explanation.

– Withdrawals from your bank account start to occur … and they are withdrawals that you haven’t scheduled or already made.

– Although you haven’t filed any insurance claims, your rates rapidly rise.

– Your Social Security statements aren’t matching your records.

– There are suspicious charges on your credit card.

– You are turned down for a loan or credit card unexpectedly.

– Your credit report shows accounts that you have not opened.

– Either federal, your state or local taxing authority alerts you to their receipt of multiple filings in your name.

– You receive a bill for an item or service that you have not purchased … and from a company that you have never done business with.

 

Have you experienced any of the above? If yes, contact a fraud resolution specialist immediately.