Scams, Scams and More Darn Scams

Scams, Scams and More Darn Scams

Did you know that there are at least 48 different types of identity theft and the number of scams involved in each is growing daily? Romance scams, residence scams, utility scams, employment scams, telephone scams, email scams, charity scams, Apple care scams, AirBNB scams, PayPal scams, census scams, ticket scams, government scams, medical scams, insurance scams, real estate scams, investment scams, lottery and sweepstakes scams … there really isn’t one facet of our lives that isn’t ‘scam-able.’ As the weather turns colder, it kind of makes you want to curl up under an electric blanket and hibernate for a bit doesn’t it!

 

Although everyone with a social security number is at risk for identity theft, there are two groups that are targeted more often: children and seniors. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has studied why. They explain, “Children are targeted to establish a ‘clean slate.’ Seniors are targeted over the telephone and through phishing scams. Some studies suggest that people become more trusting as they age, which helps to explain why it’s more difficult for older adults to detect fraudsters.”

 

The next high-risk group that follows children and seniors are the military mostly due to deployment, which impacts their ability to respond to a threat in a timely manner. According to the Federal Trade Commission, military consumers are most affected by credit card and bank fraud. Another high-risk group is identity theft repeat victims. As reported in Consumer Affairs, “people who have previously been affected by identity theft are at a greater risk for future identity theft and fraud.” According to the Center for Victim Research, “7-10% of the U.S. population are victims of identity fraud each year and 21% of those experience multiple incidents of identity theft.”

 

Lastly, the deceased are targeted. Stealing a dead person’s identity, commonly known as “ghosting,” will often go unnoticed by surviving family for months or years. A report dating from 2012 stated that 2.5 million deceased American identities are stolen each year. Of those 2.5 million stolen identities, 800,000 were used to open lines of credit or get a mobile phone plan.

 

Fraudsters oftentimes repeat their favorite most lucrative scams, which are driven by major financial life moments, such as taxes and holiday shopping. Yes, it’s getting to be that time of year, and, guess what … the world’s largest online retailer, Amazon, is seeing a huge increase in fake Amazon.com order cancellation scams. If you receive an email about an order cancellation from Amazon, there’s a good chance it’s a scam. Click on links in the email and you could unintentionally download malware onto your device. Or you might be sent to a site that aims to collect your Amazon account information, like your username and password. If you receive such an email and recently placed an order, go to Amazon.com directly to check your order status.

 

Most of our blogs offer tips to help protect yourself and your family from identity theft. There is one tip in this blog: Remain aware of scams and that they can touch every facet of your life. By staying in-the-know, you can help every month be National Cybersecurity Awareness month … not just October.

 

If you suspect that you or a loved one has suffered identity theft, please reach out to us as soon as possible. Our Guard Well member services team is available around the clock, every day of the year. Email memberservices@guardwellid.com or call 888.966.GUARD (4827) for help.

Top 10 Identity and Access Management Solution Providers – 2019

Top 10 Identity and Access Management Solution Providers – 2019

An Intelligent Way to Protect Your Employees

Guard Well Identity Theft Solutions was listed as one of the “Top 10 Identity and Access Management (IAM) Solutions Providers – 2019” in Enterprise Security Magazine. “What has intrigued us the most is that Guard Well always takes the driver’s seat in addressing the identity theft and restoration challenges through its full resolution solutions, cutting edge advanced monitoring tools and proprietary API technology. The company has been on the pinnacle in combining their 24/7 availability and an intense focus on customer service to provide the best IAM solutions today,” remarked Michael Brown, Managing Editor.

 

You can read the entire article HERE.

Two-factor Authentication Phishing  Scam

Two-factor Authentication Phishing Scam

Have you tried to log into an account of yours, such as your insurance or financial institution, and been told to confirm your identity in order to keep your credentials safe? You then receive a code either via text or email which is required for you to enter. Also known as 2FA, this SMS multi-step process has been the trusted security step to protect your accounts … until recently.

 

Unfortunately, there is an automated phishing attack on 2FA, which utilizes two tools: Muraena and NecroBrowser. Reported by Fortune, “The two tools work together like the perfect crime duo. Think of Muraena as the clever bank robber and NecroBrowser as the getaway driver.”

 

The attack was first demonstrated at the Hack in the Box Security Conference in Amsterdam last month. A video of the presentation was posted on YouTube on June 2nd bringing renewed attention to how hackers are getting better at penetrating extra layers of security, despite people using stronger tools, like 2FA.

 

So, what do you do? Do you still want to utilize SMS-based 2FA for your accounts? For the most part, the answer is yes.

 

Think of it like this. Say you want to put a lock on your front door to protect your home. Security professionals are arguing that the best type of lock available is way better than cheaper locks. Sure, makes sense. But if that more expensive lock isn’t available to you, isn’t having a cheaper lock still better than not having a lock at all?

 

As discussed on How-to-Geek’s website, there are some people who are more likely than others to be targeted by sophisticated hackers and should avoid using this SMS-based 2FA. For example, if you’re a politician, journalist, celebrity, or business leader, you could be targeted. Also, if you’re a person with access to sensitive corporate data, such as a system administrator, or just very wealthy, SMS may be too risky.

 

But, if you’re the average person with a Gmail or Facebook account and no one has a reason to spend a bunch of time getting access to your accounts, SMS authentication is fine and you should absolutely use it rather than using nothing at all.

 

If you suspect that your login credentials have been compromised, change your passwords as quickly as possible and report the website to the FTC and/or your identity theft resolution provider.

 

Sources:

https://conference.hitb.org/

https://Howtogeek.com/